Job Hazard Analysis- Protecting Our People & Managing Risk

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A Job Hazard Analysis (JHA) is a critical component of any restoration business’s safety program. A JHA is a process that involves identifying potential hazards associated with a particular job or task, assessing the risks associated with those hazards, and implementing measures to control or eliminate those hazards. 

In the restoration industry, there are several hazards that technicians may encounter throughout their daily duties. These hazards can pose a significant risk to their health and safety if they are not properly identified, planned for, and addressed. Here are some of the most common hazards that a water damage technician may encounter:

  1. Slip, trip, and fall hazards: Water damage technicians work in environments that are often wet and slippery, increasing the risk of slips, trips, and falls.
  2. Electrical hazards: Water damage technicians may come into contact with electrical equipment or wiring that has been damaged by water. This can pose a significant risk of electrical shock or electrocution.
  3. Exposure to hazardous materials: Water damage can often result in exposure to hazardous materials such as Asbestos or Lead that can cause respiratory or other health issues. 
  4. Physical hazards: Water damage technicians may encounter physical hazards such as sharp objects, debris, or unstable structures that can cause injuries.
  5. Chemical hazards: Water damage can result in the deliberate or accidental release of cleaning chemicals, solvents, antimicrobials, or other hazardous materials that can pose a risk of chemical burns or other health problems.
  6. Ergonomic hazards: Water damage technicians often perform physically demanding work, such as carrying heavy equipment or working in awkward positions, which can lead to strains, sprains, or other musculoskeletal injuries.
  7. Environmental hazards: Water damage can result in exposure to environmental hazards such as sewage, mold, bacteria, and other pathogens that can pose a risk to health serious health issues.

A JHA is required in a restoration business because it is required by law under Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations. Specifically, OSHA’s General Duty Clause requires employers to provide a workplace free from recognized hazards that are likely to cause death or serious physical harm to employees. By conducting a JHA, a restoration business can identify potential hazards and take steps to eliminate or control those hazards, thus fulfilling its obligation to provide a safe workplace for its employees.

Now that you know what a JHA is and the requirements of competing one for every job; we will be discussing the benefits of completing a JHA. The what’s in it for “WE”? There are several benefits that businesses can see from completing a Job Hazard Analysis (JHA) on every job. Here are a few of those key benefits for you and your team, the “WE” factor:

  1. Improved safety: One of the most significant benefits of completing a JHA is that it can help improve safety in the workplace. By identifying potential hazards and assessing the risks associated with them, businesses can take steps to eliminate or control those hazards, reducing the likelihood of accidents and injuries.
  2. Compliance with regulations: Completing a JHA is required by law under Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations. By completing a JHA for every job, businesses can ensure that they are in compliance with these regulations and avoid potential fines or other penalties.
  3. More efficient operations: By identifying potential hazards and implementing measures to control or eliminate them, businesses can create a safer and more efficient work environment. This can result in fewer delays, less downtime, and improved productivity.
  4. Increased employee involvement: Involving employees in the JHA process can help increase their awareness of potential hazards and their role in maintaining a safe workplace. This can result in a more engaged and empowered workforce, leading to improved morale and job satisfaction.
  5. Reduced costs: Finally, completing a JHA can help businesses reduce costs associated with accidents and injuries, such as medical expenses, lost productivity, and workers’ compensation claims.

Now that we have discussed what a Job Hazard Analysis (JHA) is, why it is important, the OSHA requirements in having one, and what are the benefits; We will go over what is included in a JHA and how can you implement it. Employees can provide valuable insights into the hazards associated with their jobs and help identify effective control measures. It is important to involve employees in the JHA process to ensure their input and participation. 

A Job Hazard Analysis (JHA) plan typically includes the following components:

  1. Job Description: A detailed description of the job or task being analyzed.
  2. Task List: A list of all the steps involved in the job or task.
  3. Hazards Identification: A list of potential hazards associated with each step.
  4. Risk Assessment: An assessment of the likelihood and severity of each hazard.
  5. Control Measures: A plan for eliminating or controlling each hazard.
  6. Training: A plan for training employees on the hazards associated with the job or task and the control measures in place.
  7. Review and Update: A plan for reviewing and updating the JHA plan regularly.
  8. Signatures: A section for technicians, subcontractors, or visitors to sign off on that they have read and reviewed the JHA plan.

There are several resources available to help with the implementation of a JHA plan, including OSHA’s JHA guidance document and various JHA templates that can be found online. In general here are the steps to implement a JHA plan:

  1. Train employees: Train employees annually or as a project may dictate on the hazards associated with the project or task and the control measures in place.
  2. Choose the job or task to analyze: Select a job or task that has a significant risk of injury or illness.
  3. Break down the job or task into steps: Identify and list each step involved in the job or task.
  4. Identify hazards: Identify and list all the potential hazards associated with each step of the job or task.
  5. Assess risks: Evaluate the likelihood and severity of each hazard and assess the risk associated with it.
  6. Implement control measures: Develop and implement control measures to eliminate or control each hazard identified.
  7. Review and update annually: Regularly review and update the company JHA plan to ensure it remains effective and relevant. 

In summary, completing a JHA for every job can provide several benefits to businesses, including improved safety, compliance with regulations, more efficient operations, increased employee involvement, and reduced costs. 

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Scott Maysura

Scott is a senior consultant at Floodlight Consulting Group with over 20 years of experience in the restoration industry, including ownership in restoration startups. He collaborates closely with clients to drive business growth and success by developing and implementing strategic plans, systems and processes. Scott brings strong business acumen, extensive commercial large loss experience, operations management, and significant coaching experience to the Floodlight team. He has worked in every key role in the industry, from a technician to owning a restoration and consulting company. He holds a Bachelor’s degree in Psychology, a diploma in Small Business Management, and is a Triple Master restorer in the industry.

Scott resides in the beautiful state of New Mexico with his wife of 17 years, Christine and their 2 dogs – Harley and Astrid.

Email Scott at: scottm@floodlightgrp.com

Listen to the Floodlight Head Heart and Boots Podcast on Apple iTunes and Spotify.

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